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Jasminder OberoiJasmiender Oberoi: http://www.facebook.com/jassioberai and http://www.facebook.com/jasfotographypage

 

 

 

 

Thank you for Jasminder Oberoi who has allowed his writing to be share.  All photo by: ronnybuol exp #6 and #8

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#1

Don’t let telephone poles or trees sprout out of your subject’s head. Check the background carefully. Look over your subject’s shoulder to see whether any poles, trees or even cars are in the background. Sometimes simply moving a step to the left or right a few feet can make your picture much better.

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#2

#2 Use a long exposure to soften streams and waterfalls. Place your camera on a tripod and use a small aperture (f/11or f/22) to drive down your shutter speed to 2 seconds or longer. This will give flowing water the milky look you want. Make sure the camera is steady, then shoot a lot.

 

 

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#3

Look up and down when walking around. The best picture may not be at eye level. Sometimes pointing the camera straight down on flowers or patterns in the sidewalk will give you impressive results. Looking up at buildings or the sky will also give you an interesting viewpoint.

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#4

#4Use depth of field in nature photography to get everything in focus. If you are placing an object in the foreground to create depth, use a maximum (high number) f/stop. This will get more of the scene in focus, front to back. If using a compact camera, set the camera to landscape scene mode.

 

 

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#5

#5 Turn your flash on during the day. Harsh shadows often show up in your portraits in the daylight. Fill in those shadows by turning on your flash, brightening up those dark areas. Just go to your flash setting and force your flash to shoot all the time. It will work even in bright light.

 

 

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#6

#6 After you have downloaded photos from your memory card, and checked the computer to make sure the files are visible, reformat the memory card in the camera. Don’t use the “delete all” function of the camera or your imaging program.

Please the check this link: http://www.ehow.com/how_4882848_format-compact-flash-card.html

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#7

#7 The difference between a snapshot and a great photograph is that snapshots capture events while photographs capture feelings. Make sure your photo tells a story by thinking about what you’re trying to say before you take the photo.

 

 

 

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#8

#8 Need to diffuse the light from your flash in a pinch? Use a tissue held a few inches from the flash. The transparency of the paper will be enough to let some light through, and soften the light.

One tip on Bird Photography: Always try and use flash while shooting a bird. The flash does not scare or bother the bird and it gives you that catchlight in the eye that adds life to the bird pic..

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#9 #9

Shoot landscapes at the most vibrant times of the day. Midday shooting often does not produce the results you are expecting. Shoot your best outdoor shots during the golden hours – soon after sunrise or shortly before sunset.

 

 

 

 

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#10-11

#10

When you find a subject you want to photograph don’t take just take one shot. Work the subject; try different camera settings, angles and focal lengths.

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#11

Shoot until you’re sure you have the photo you want. Don’t risk losing a good picture because you were worried about taking too many shots. With digital, there’s no need to “conserve film.” Sometimes the best shot can be the third or fourth one.

 

 

 

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#12 #12

Try photographing flowers early in the morning when dew is on the petals. If there’s no dew, make your own. Take a small sprayer and fill it with glycerin and water and spray the flowers for those natural looking dewdrops. Glycerin helps the drops stay large, but you can just use water if you don’t have any glycerin.

 

 

 

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#13

#13 Those great soft-focus backgrounds you see on so many flower photos? They’re often the result of shooting with the lens wide open-that is, at the widest f/stop, which means the shallowest depth of field.

 

 

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#14 #14

Check the direction of the light. Sometimes the best light on a person, monument or scene is not the most obvious. Moving around and seeing the light from all angles will expand your vision and make a unique picture. Make it a habit to do this whenever you have time.

 

 

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#15

#15

Change your white balance during a sunrise or sunset. Take your camera off auto white balance and switch to Cloudy or Shady white balance. This will add more strength to the reds, oranges and yellows you see. Auto tries to keep colors neutral.

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#16

#16

Try different kinds of framing with your flower shots. Instead of centering the flower, try having it off to the left or the right of the frame. This will allow for you to be creative with the negative space (areas without the subject). Look for the patterns of other out of focus flowers in the background.

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#17

#17

Always have your camera with you. Use it everywhere – restaurants, streets, coming home from the office, even in your own backyard. Don’t limit yourself to monuments, and photo walks. Become an everyday photographer than just being limited to being a weekly photographer. Everyday use can expand your photography.

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#18

Successful close-ups of babies often involve eye contact. Focus on the eyes. Use a longer lens, or a macro lens, and get in tight on the eyes and nose. A lot of a child’s personality comes through the eyes. Remember to try to keep the nearest eye in focus, as that will feel more natural to the viewer.

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#19 #19

One of the most important settings on a camera is Exposure Compensation. It looks like a +/- sign. Here’s the quick rule of thumb: Adjust it towards the + setting when you want your photo to be lighter and the – setting when you want it darker. (The settings are in fractions of an f/stop so moving +.3 is a third-of-a-stop lighter.)

Please check the link: http://www.radiantlite.com/2009/07/exposure-compensation-adjustment.html

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#20

Professional photographers often play music when they’re shooting in the studio, to help their portrait subjects relax. When photographing people, ask your subjects what music want to listen to and then crank up the tunes. People smile more easily when they’re listening to music they like.

That is nice example: http://www.ba-reps.com/blog/brian-doben-people-country-stars/

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#21

#21

The eyes, it is said, are the windows to the soul. Capture the personality of your subject, through her eyes. Make sure you can see them by zooming in on your subject or moving in close to her.

 

 

 

 

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#22

#22 The weather is heating up, so while you’re wielding your camera on your upcoming vacations, this tip will come in handy — remember to "watch your horizons." What this means: if you’re taking landscape photos (and especially pictures of the beach, or bodies of water), your horizon (the line that separates earth from sky) should be off-center — not jetting through the middle of your photograph — in order to give your image more character. Similar to the rule of thirds, your horizons would be best placed higher or lower than the middle of your frame. Also the horizon has to straight. Just take extra on this front as well. But as always — "rules" like these are meant to be broken, so be sure to experiment!

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#23

#23

Get in close on your subject – If your subject is smaller than a car, take a step or two closer before taking the picture and zoom in on your subject. Your goal is to fill the picture area with the subject you are photographing. Up close you can reveal telling details, like a sprinkle of freckles or an arched eyebrow.

And that sprinkle of freckles could turn out to be the best part of your picture.